VIDEO FORMAT TIMELINE

Broadcast Duplication at Oxford Duplication Centre

Broadcast tapes converted to digital format Oxfordshire UK

Video Format - A history of video recording and playback. From 1950's onward. To include video formats.

1950's:

1956: Amplex. The first commercially successful video tape format for broadcast use. 2" quadruplex. The BBC conducted a live demonstration of the VERA video tape recording system it had been developing since 1952. But removes it in favour of the quadruplex.

1960's

1961 - 1970: Amplex 2" helical Scan Video Tape

1964 -  early 1970's:  Sony EV 1" open reel video tape.

1969 - early 1980's: EIAJ-1/2" open reel video tape.

1970's

Sony launches the first video cassette format  U-matic. It reached the UK in 1973. Used for the domestic market but it soon finds a new market  in the educational, industrial and broadcast applications in 1971.

1972: Cartrivision - US first video format to offer films for rental

1972 - 1973: Cartrivision

1972 - late 1970's: EIAJ-2

1972 - late 1970's:  V-Cord

1972 - 1979: Video Cassette Recording (VCR)

1973 - 1990's: U-matic

1974 - 1990's: U-matic S

1975: Sony introduces Betamax VCR in Japan and US

1975 - 1977: VX

1975 - 1978: Television Electronic Disc (TeD)

1975 - 1980's: 1" Type B

1976: JVC introduces VHS in Japan

1976 - mid 1990's: 1" Type C

1977: First video rental store in US opens in LA

1977 - late 2000's: VHS (Video Home System)

1978 - 1988: Betamax

1978: Telefunken omits TeD for VHS

1979: Super Video  Recording SVR

1979 - 1988: Video 2000 / Video Compact Cassette

1980's

1980 - 1983: Compact Video Cassette (CVC)

1981 - 1986: CED / SelectaVision

1982 - 1990's: Betacam

1982 - late 2000's: Compact VHS (VHS-C)

1983: Sony introduces Betacam camcorder. The first integrated camera and video recorder for professional use.  Prior video cameras were connected to a separate recorder unit.

1983 - 1986: Video High Density (VHD)

1983 - 1990's: Video single

1983 - 2001: LaserDisc

1983 - 2001: LaserDisc EP

The Sony Corp v Universal City Studios (the Betamax case) is settled, with US supreme court determining home video recording is legal in US.

1985 - 1988: SuperBeta

1985 - 2000's: Video8

1985: The Jewel of the Nile is last feature film to be released on CEDs/SelectaVision 1986.

1986: Compact LaserDisc

1986 - late 1990's: U-matic SP

1986 - 2001: Betacam SP

1986 - early 1990's: Mll

1987: Sony introduces first commercial digital videotape format D1.

1987 - 1990's: D1

1987 - 1990's: CD-Video

1987 - early 2000's: S-VHS

1987 - early 2000's: S-VHS-C

1988: Philips and Grundig end distribution of Video 2000 home video format after losing out to VHS.

1988 -early 1990's: Extended Definition Beta

1988 - 2000's: D2

1989 - 2007: Hi8

1990's

1990 - 1991: Video Single Disc

1990 - 2002: Laser Juke

1993: Sony ceases production of Betamax VCRs for US market.

1993 - 1994: CD-i Digital Video

1993 - 2016: Digital Betacam

1993 -2000's:  Video CD

1994 - late 2000's: D5/D5 HD

1995: DVD-Video is launched in Japan.

1995 - late 2000's: MiniDV

1995 - early 2010's: DVCPRO

1996 - 2007: Betacam SX

1996 - Present: DVCAM

1997:  DVD-Video is launched in US.

1997 - late 1990's: MovieCD

1997 - 2016: HDCAM

1997 - present: MiniDVD-R

1998: DVD-Video is launched in the UK and Europe.

1998 - present: Interactive DVD

1998 - present: DVD-10 / doubled sided DVD

1998 - 1999: DIVX Digital Video Express

1998 - 1999: Sony Ruvi

1998 - 2007: D-VHS

1999 - 2007: Digital8

2000's

2001 - 2006:  MicroMV

2001 - 2007: Superbit

2001 - 2016: MPEG IMX

2002: Worldwide production of DVD-Video discs surpasses VHS tapes.

2002: Sony stops producing Betamax video cassette recorders.

2002 - 2004: D-Theater

2003 - 2006: Personal Video Disc PVD

2003 - 2009: Flexplay

2003- 2011: HDV

2003 - 2016: HDCAM SR

2003 - present: Professional  Disc

2004 - 2007: Nintendo Game Boy  Advance Video

2004 - 2011: Universal Media Disc

2005 - 2009: DualDisc

2006 - 2008: HD DVD

2006 - present: Blu-ray Disc

2006 - present: Blu-ray Disc Recordable (BD-R)

2006 - present: Blu-ray Recordable Erasable (BD-RE)

2007: Netflix launches its steaming video service

2008: JVC, the company that invented VHS format ceases production of standalone VHS video cassette recorders.

2008: Toshiba announces it will no longer manufacture or market HD DVD players or disc drives, ending the format war with Blu-Ray.

2009: Pioneer ceases production of its remaining LaserDisc players.

2010;s

2013: Blockbusters goes into administration in the UK.

2014: Sony announces it will discontinue Playstation Portable.

2015: Sony ceases production of Betamax cassettes.

2016: Funai Electronics ceases to make VHS recorders and production. They were the last company to make VHS.

2016: Sony discontinues its remaining 1/2" professional video tape recorders, including Digital Betacam, MPEG IMX, HDCAM and HDCAM SR formats.

2017: Amazon UK ends its LoveFilm by Post DVD and Blu-Ray disc rental service citing demand for streaming.

Transfer your Professional NTSC and PAL tape formats - DVCAM, MiniDV, HDV, Betacam (SP, SX and DigiBeta), Sony IMX, HDCAM, DVCPRO (25/50/100) tapes - U-Matic 3/4", and Sony open reel 1/2" and 1" video tapes. Videotapes to Digital MP4 video file available. Editable DV files with timecode (for PC or Mac) available upon request. 7-10 day average delivery time.

OUR SERVICES IN BETACAM BROADCAST CONVERSION

BROADCAST AND CORPORATE VIDEO TAPES SUITABLE USES FORMAT 1+ 5+ 10+ 25+ 50+ 100+
SVHS/U-MATIC/BETACAM/JVC/DVC VIEWING H.264 MPEG4 35.45 32.25 29.25 26.50 24.25 22.00
EDITING PRO-RES 40.25 36.75 33.25 30.25 27.50 25.00
ARCHIVING FFV1 40.25 36.75 33.25 30.25 27.50 25.00
PROFESSIONAL ARCHIVING 10BIT UNCOMPRESSED 48.50 44.00 40.00 36.50 33.00 30.00
We offer many different formats but the most common are above and priced accordingly. 10bit uncompressed is considered to be National Archive quality and suitable as an original master mezzanine format from which further copies can be made in any format. FFV1 is considered suitable for archiving as a lossless compression format.  Apple Pro-Res is a lossy format available in several quality levels and ideal for video editing due to its file sizes. MPEG4 is also lossy but highly efficient and ideal as a digital copy for viewing purposes.

Broadcast tapes typically have superior video and sound quality to that of a consumer tape. There are a variety of broadcast tapes we can transfer to digital file.

We can capture content from Professional Broadcast video tapes and convert it to new digital formats such as ProRes 422, H.264 MOV, H.264 MP4, DVD and Blu-ray Disc.

Optional archived backup to our cloud is offered as well. Supported NTSC and PAL tape formats - DVCAM, MiniDV, HDV, Betacam (SP, SX and DigiBeta), Sony IMX, HDCAM, DVCPRO (25/50/100) tapes - U-Matic 3/4", and Sony open reel 1/2" and 1" video tapes.

Contact Us 01865 457000

Office Hours: Monday - Thursday 9am-5pm / Friday 9am-3pm

29 Banbury Road Kidlington Oxfordshire OX5 1AQ United Kingdom
cheryl@oxfordduplicationcentre.com